Online

Our interactive online courses take place on a networked platform called Campus – where students will be able to take courses and interact with other students within open and closed groups within the platform. 

The interactive online courses will still run as they did previously, with students posting or circulating poems in advance of a two hour live chat session. During the chat session, the tutor and your fellow students post responses to the circulated work.  Each live chat will be archived for you to revisit later. There will also be accompanying groups, both inside and outside the courses, where you can talk to your fellow students in between chats.

Written-feedback based courses don't have a live chat element – discussion of students' poems takes place within a closed group, with an uploaded document of tutor comments at convenient times throughout the course.

Online courses are a great way to connect with other poets around the world, and you don't even have to leave the house. All you need is an internet connection and a computer.

Campus is at www.campus.poetryschool.com

You will need to have easy access to the internet via a broadband connection. 

27 courses found
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06 Feb 2015, Open to all, Interactive Online Course, Jonathan Edwards.
‘A poem is like a much, much richer joke’ – Adam Zagajewski. On this course, you’ll look at some seriously funny poems by the likes of Glyn Maxwell, Simon Armitage, Thomas Lux, Jo Shapcott and Carol Ann Duffy, exploring a range of approaches to the comic, considering aspects such as narrative, allegory and the use of the surreal. You’ll look at a range of forms, such as the sonnet and the villanelle, and how they can be used to shift a comic poem into seriousness; and how the use of everyday life and characters can result in strange and original comic impacts. Looking at ‘crossover’ writers such as Benjamin Zephaniah and John Cooper Clarke, this course will also seek to bridge the relationship between ‘page’ and ‘performance’ poetry, seeking similarities rather than differences in how both employ comic techniques. Lastly, you will look at what in literary terms is often seen as ‘bad’ comic poetry, while seeking to develop our own comic poems which, while they will hopefully make people smile or laugh, will go far beyond the confines of what is traditionally considered as light verse.

CAMPUS group: http://campus.poetryschool.com/groups/no-laughs-please-were-poets-can-comic-poetry-be-good-poetry/

Please note: All our online courses take place on CAMPUS, a unique social network and learning platform created by The Poetry School. These courses are open to all students but a basic level of digital literacy is essential. The Poetry School can help you with technical issues, but you also need to be a confident user of digital platforms to take part in these classes. To find out whether an online course is right for you, please email online@poetryschool.com

Register for your free CAMPUS account here: http://campus.poetryschool.com/
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24 Sep 2014, Open to all, Interactive Online Course, Various (see course details for more).
Tutors: Kim Moore, J T Welsch, Harry Man, Holly Corfield Carr, Jen Campbell

A brand new season! Five more of our favourite poets. Five more random exercises. Plunge into the unknown and explore the possibilities of your voice and verse technique with this mystery assortment of poetic delights. Each assignment on 5 Easy Pieces has been uniquely created by one our hand-selected team of tutors, each one aimed at students of all levels. The twist? Your assignments will only be revealed at very last moment, exactly two weeks prior to each live chat. If you’re looking for a variety of stimulating activities to help generate new kinds of poetry or simply fancy putting your poetic wits to test, you need look no further. What secrets will this sweet jar reveal? Will it be a Chocolate Hazelnut Dream, or one of those nasty things with the orange liqueur? There’s only one way to find out…


Please note: Online courses are open to all students but a basic level of digital literacy is essential. The Poetry School can help you with CAMPUS technical issues, but you need to be a confident user of digital platforms to take part in these classes. To find out whether an online course is right for you, please email online@poetryschool.com

Register for your free CAMPUS account here:
http://campus.poetryschool.com/
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18 Sep 2014, Open to all, Interactive Online Course, Holly Hopkins.
Geoffrey Hill was the ‘greatest living poet of the English language’ according to Harold Bloom in 1986, and was still the ‘greatest living poet in the English Language’ when reviewed by the Guardian last year. Find out why he’s so praised as we read Mercian Hymns, one of Hill’s most compelling sequences. Hill’s sharp, witty and utterly beguiling sequence centres on King Offa, the 8th Century ruler of Mercia, transported into Hill’s own war-time childhood. The course will take place over five fortnightly online sessions and our reading of 'Mercian Hymns' will be contextualized with additional poems by Hill and his contemporaries. This reading course will also include optional prompts, inspired by Hill’s work, to help you create your own poems.

CAMPUS group: http://campus.poetryschool.com/groups/a-name-to-conjure-with-reading-mercian-hymns

Please note: All our online courses take place on CAMPUS, a unique social network and learning platform created by The Poetry School. These courses are open to all students but a basic level of digital literacy is essential. The Poetry School can help you with technical issues, but you also need to be a confident user of digital platforms to take part in these classes. To find out whether an online course is right for you, please email online@poetryschool.com

Register for your free CAMPUS account here:
http://campus.poetryschool.com/
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19 Sep 2014, Open to all, Interactive Online Course, A B Jackson.
Animals can provide a focus for the outward gaze and the inward gaze: a source of curiosity and wonder in the world at large, or totemic symbols of human fears and desires. In the poetry of animals these two visions often meet and mix. This course will cover five topics: micro-organisms, creatures of the ocean, the parasite and the parasitic cycle, legendary or apocalyptic beasts, and the human or shape-shifting animal. You will write a poem on each of these topics, and some research will be required in order to identify creatures of interest and learn about their habits. You will also take your inspiration from poems by Elizabeth Bishop, Clare Pollard, Jen Hadfield, Sarah Lindsay, D.H. Lawrence, W.B. Yeats, John Burnside, Alexander Hutchison and Robin Robertson.

CAMPUS group: http://campus.poetryschool.com/groups/animal-magick-real-and-imaginary-beasts/

Please note: All our online courses take place on CAMPUS, a unique social network and learning platform created by The Poetry School. These courses are open to all students but a basic level of digital literacy is essential. The Poetry School can help you with technical issues, but you also need to be a confident user of digital platforms to take part in these classes. To find out whether an online course is right for you, please email online@poetryschool.com

Register for your free CAMPUS account here:
http://campus.poetryschool.com/
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29 Jan 2015, Open to all, Interactive Online Course, Claire Trévien.
Is your version of the sea Derek Walcott’s ‘grey vault’ of history or are its ‘edges overgrown with lace’ as Ivan V Lalic would have it? The seascape has long been a favourite with poets, yet our relationship with it has never been entirely comfortable: it threatens to rise, swallows planes whole, and a large portion of its depths remains unchartered and unknown. In this course, we will look at the different ways in which the sea can inspire, intrude and disrupt your writing practice. From creatures of the deep to submerged forests, from coast-cultures to the sea as a foreign planet, you will encounter a variety of texts that will encourage you to create work that engages with the sea’s multiple facets.

CAMPUS group: http://campus.poetryschool.com/groups/deep-diving-poetry-the-language-of-coastlines-and-the-sea/

Please note: All our online courses take place on CAMPUS, a unique social network and learning platform created by The Poetry School. These courses are open to all students but a basic level of digital literacy is essential. The Poetry School can help you with technical issues, but you also need to be a confident user of digital platforms to take part in these classes. To find out whether an online course is right for you, please email online@poetryschool.com

Register for your free CAMPUS account here: http://campus.poetryschool.com/
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26 Jan 2015, Open to all, Interactive Online Course, Ben Wilkinson.
‘All that we see or seem is but a dream within a dream’ said Edgar Allen Poe. Stark or wondrous, sinister or downright strange – the power and possibility of the phantasmagorical has fascinated poets from Coleridge’s ‘Kubla Khan’, through John Berryman’s Dream Songs to Don Paterson’s Alexandrian library. Dreams are places to get lost and lose yourself in, where the unconscious runs wild, and nothing is ever quite as it seems. In poems, they can grant access to weirdly credible worlds beyond the routine, image-rich and unstable. Where does the dream end, and reality begin? How does a dreamscape supercharge a poem’s symbolism? Like the best poems, can we ever forget our dreams? Or do they linger, as Paterson puts it, in ‘that part of the mind that the mind cannot contemplate’? This course will dive into the reveries conjured by contemporary poets including Jacob Polley, Frances Leviston, Adrienne Rich, August Kleinzahler, John Burnside and Emily Berry, to see just how deep down the rabbit-hole poems can go.

CAMPUS group: http://campus.poetryschool.com/groups/dream-on-waking-up-your-poems-with-the-phantasmagoric/

Please note: All our online courses take place on CAMPUS, a unique social network and learning platform created by The Poetry School. These courses are open to all students but a basic level of digital literacy is essential. The Poetry School can help you with technical issues, but you also need to be a confident user of digital platforms to take part in these classes. To find out whether an online course is right for you, please email online@poetryschool.com

Register for your free CAMPUS account here: http://campus.poetryschool.com/
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27 Jan 2015, Open to all, Interactive Online Course, Kathryn Maris.
In this genre-bending course, you will look at poets, fiction writers, philosophers and psychoanalysts who think and write in fragments, use modes of interruption or whose work simply survives in fragment form.
Fortnightly reading and writing assignments will aim to broaden your ideas of what is and isn't a poem, demonstrate the value of omission and the unstated, and suggest new ways of observing yourself and the world, and of communicating those observations. The course will include texts by Sappho, Lydia Davis, Kimiko Hahn, Simone Weil, Zata Kitowski , Adam Phillips, Wallace Stevens, Theodor Adorno, Gertrude Stein, Sam Riviere, Nuar Alsadir, Simon Smith, Anne Carson and others. (This is a repeat of a course that has run previously).

CAMPUS group: http://campus.poetryschool.com/groups/fragments-from-the-thought-to-the-page-spring-2015/

Please note: All our online courses take place on CAMPUS, a unique social network and learning platform created by The Poetry School. These courses are open to all students but a basic level of digital literacy is essential. The Poetry School can help you with technical issues, but you also need to be a confident user of digital platforms to take part in these classes. To find out whether an online course is right for you, please email online@poetryschool.com

Register for your free CAMPUS account here: http://campus.poetryschool.com/
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16 Sep 2014, Open to all, Interactive Online Course, Kathryn Maris.
In this genre-bending course, you will look at poets, fiction writers, philosophers and psychoanalysts who think and write in fragments, use modes of interruption or whose work simply survives in fragment form. Fortnightly reading and writing assignments will aim to broaden your ideas of what is and isn't a poem, demonstrate the value of omission and the unstated, and suggest new ways of observing yourself and the world, and of communicating those observations. The course will include texts by Sappho, Lydia Davis, Kimiko Hahn, Simone Weil, Adam Phillips, Wallace Stevens, Theodor Adorno, Gertrude Stein, Sam Riviere, Nuar Alsadir, Simon Smith, Anne Carson and others.

CAMPUS group: http://campus.poetryschool.com/groups/fragments-from-the-thought-to-the-page/

Please note: All our online courses take place on CAMPUS, a unique social network and learning platform created by The Poetry School. These courses are open to all students but a basic level of digital literacy is essential. The Poetry School can help you with technical issues, but you also need to be a confident user of digital platforms to take part in these classes. To find out whether an online course is right for you, please email online@poetryschool.com

Register for your free CAMPUS account here:
http://campus.poetryschool.com/
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26 Jan 2015, Open to all, Interactive Online Course, S J Fowler.
Five sessions; five great, European avant-gardes. Explore contemporary innovations in European poetry with British vanguardist S J Fowler, and discover how their remarkable explorations in the written word often compliment, rather than antagonise, more formal writing practice. A course stressing the contemporary, Maintenant! will introduce 5 great poetic movements that will springboard you into new writing techniques, stressing the possibility amidst the history. Covering Oulipo, Austrian modernism, Concrete poetry, CoBra and the British poetry revival, this course - with the energy, dynamism and invention of the movements it explores - will enrich anyone’s poetry horizons.

CAMPUS group: http://campus.poetryschool.com/groups/maintenant-international-edition/

Please note: All our online courses take place on CAMPUS, a unique social network and learning platform created by The Poetry School. These courses are open to all students but a basic level of digital literacy is essential. The Poetry School can help you with technical issues, but you also need to be a confident user of digital platforms to take part in these classes. To find out whether an online course is right for you, please email online@poetryschool.com

Register for your free CAMPUS account here: http://campus.poetryschool.com/
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03 Feb 2015, Open to all, Interactive Online Course, Kate Potts.
In the preface to his groundbreaking and influential work A Dictionary of the English Language Samuel Johnson describes himself as “a poet doomed at last to wake a lexicographer”. How does poetry – with its subjective content and its concern with what’s outside and beyond language – relate and respond to the relatively utilitarian form, function and language of the dictionary? How have poets used and commented on the dictionaries as ‘guardians of the cultural tradition’? In this course we will explore and examine dictionaries and their power through a series of activities including making dictionary definition poems; writing with dialect, archaic, unusual and invented words; and creating and using taxonomies. We will look at unusual and idiosyncratic dictionaries, and use Oulipan dictionary-based techniques. We will also study and draw inspiration from the work of dictionary-loving poets including Kei Miller, Robert Pinsky, Mary Kinzie, Harryette Mullen, Giles Goodland, Jen Hadfield, John McCullough, and Anne Carson.

CAMPUS group: http://campus.poetryschool.com/groups/new-definitions-and-neologisms-the-poetry-of-dictionaries/

Please note: All our online courses take place on CAMPUS, a unique social network and learning platform created by The Poetry School. These courses are open to all students but a basic level of digital literacy is essential. The Poetry School can help you with technical issues, but you also need to be a confident user of digital platforms to take part in these classes. To find out whether an online course is right for you, please email online@poetryschool.com

Register for your free CAMPUS account here: http://campus.poetryschool.com/

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27 Jan 2015, Intermediate, Interactive Online Course, Catherine Smith.
Do you have a heap of discarded poems sitting on your sideboard or desktop which just won’t work no matter how many revisions you make? The Poetry School’s online feedback workshops provide a place for the general improvement of your left-for-dead poems, your work in need of refreshment, and your brand new pieces. Bring poems of any size or shape to these sessions for detailed written feedback once a fortnight from a tutor, and general group feedback from fellow students. This group will be especially good for those with a large batch of poems that they are looking to ready for magazine submission.

CAMPUS group: http://campus.poetryschool.com/groups/online-feedback-course-with-catherine-smith/

Please note: All our online courses take place on CAMPUS, a unique social network and learning platform created by The Poetry School. These courses are open to all students but a basic level of digital literacy is essential. The Poetry School can help you with technical issues, but you also need to be a confident user of digital platforms to take part in these classes. To find out whether an online course is right for you, please email online@poetryschool.com

Register for your free CAMPUS account here: http://campus.poetryschool.com/
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28 Jan 2015, Open to all, Interactive Online Course, John Clegg.
Do you have a heap of discarded poems sitting on your sideboard or desktop which just won’t work no matter how many revisions you make? The Poetry School’s online feedback workshops provide a place for the general improvement of your left-for-dead poems, your work in need of refreshment, and your brand new pieces. Bring poems of any size or shape to these sessions for detailed written feedback once a fortnight from a tutor, and general group feedback from fellow students. This group will be especially good for those with a large batch of poems that they are looking to ready for magazine submission.

CAMPUS group: http://campus.poetryschool.com/groups/online-feedback-course-with-john-clegg/

Please note: All our online courses take place on CAMPUS, a unique social network and learning platform created by The Poetry School. These courses are open to all students but a basic level of digital literacy is essential. The Poetry School can help you with technical issues, but you also need to be a confident user of digital platforms to take part in these classes. To find out whether an online course is right for you, please email online@poetryschool.com

Register for your free CAMPUS account here: http://campus.poetryschool.com/
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17 Sep 2014, Open to all, Interactive Online Course, John McCullough.
Do you have a heap of discarded poems which just won’t work no matter how many revisions you make? The Poetry School’s Online Feedback Workshops provide a place for the general improvement of left-for-dead poems in need of resuscitation. Bring poems of any shape or size once a fortnight and receive detailed feedback from your tutor and general advice from fellow students. This course is ideal for those looking to ready poems for magazine submission.

CAMPUS group: http://campus.poetryschool.com/groups/online-feedback-course-with-john-mccollough

Please note: All our online courses take place on CAMPUS, a unique social network and learning platform created by The Poetry School. These courses are open to all students but a basic level of digital literacy is essential. The Poetry School can help you with technical issues, but you also need to be a confident user of digital platforms to take part in these classes. To find out whether an online course is right for you, please email online@poetryschool.com

Register for your free CAMPUS account here:
http://campus.poetryschool.com/
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16 Sep 2014, Advanced, Interactive Online Course, Karen McCarthy Woolf.
Do you have a heap of discarded poems which just won’t work no matter how many revisions you make? The Poetry School’s Online Feedback Workshops provide a place for the general improvement of left-for-dead poems in need of resuscitation. Bring poems of any shape or size once a fortnight and receive detailed feedback from your tutor and general advice from fellow students. This course is ideal for those looking to ready poems for magazine submission. Recommended for poets at a intermediate / advanced level.

CAMPUS group: http://campus.poetryschool.com/groups/online-feedback-course-with-karen-mccarthy-woolf

Please note: All our online courses take place on CAMPUS, a unique social network and learning platform created by The Poetry School. These courses are open to all students but a basic level of digital literacy is essential. The Poetry School can help you with technical issues, but you also need to be a confident user of digital platforms to take part in these classes. To find out whether an online course is right for you, please email online@poetryschool.com

Register for your free CAMPUS account here:
http://campus.poetryschool.com/
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22 Sep 2014, Open to all, Interactive Online Course, Helen Mort.
What’s on your mind? Or rather, what’s in it? Neuroscience is now so popular that some scientists say ‘you are your brain’. Technologies like fMRI have something to tell us about how we look at paintings, why we buy things, how we vote and what we find beautiful. But can the science of the brain inspire new art? This course will look at how poetry often tackles the same fundamental questions as neuroscience about what it means to be human. You will consider themes such as memory, embodiment, synaesthesia and pattern-formation and look at poems that challenge the idea that the brain is confined to the body. You’ll also discuss work by Norman MacCaig, Michael Donaghy, Liz Berry, Paul Muldoon, Andrew Greig and Andrew Waterhouse. The writing exercises will be accessible to everyone and no scientific knowledge is necessary.

CAMPUS group: http://campus.poetryschool.com/groups/poetry-and-the-brain/

Please note: All our online courses take place on CAMPUS, a unique social network and learning platform created by The Poetry School. These courses are open to all students but a basic level of digital literacy is essential. The Poetry School can help you with technical issues, but you also need to be a confident user of digital platforms to take part in these classes. To find out whether an online course is right for you, please email online@poetryschool.com

Register for your free CAMPUS account here:
http://campus.poetryschool.com/
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02 Feb 2015, Open to all, Interactive Online Course, Helen Mort.
What’s on your mind? Or rather, what’s in it? Neuroscience is now so popular that some scientists say ‘you are your brain’. Technologies like fMRI have something to tell us about how we look at paintings, why we buy things, how we vote and what we find beautiful. But can the science of the brain inspire new art? This course will look at how poetry often tackles the same fundamental questions as neuroscience about what it means to be human. You will consider themes such as memory, embodiment, synaesthesia and patternformation and look at poems that challenge the idea that the brain is confined to the body. You’ll also discuss work by Norman MacCaig, Michael Donaghy, Liz Berry, Paul Muldoon, Andrew Greig and Andrew Waterhouse. The writing exercises will be accessible to everyone and no scientific knowledge is necessary. (This is a repeat of a course that has run previously).

CAMPUS group: http://campus.poetryschool.com/groups/poetry-and-the-brain-spring-2015/

Please note: All our online courses take place on CAMPUS, a unique social network and learning platform created by The Poetry School. These courses are open to all students but a basic level of digital literacy is essential. The Poetry School can help you with technical issues, but you also need to be a confident user of digital platforms to take part in these classes. To find out whether an online course is right for you, please email online@poetryschool.com

Register for your free CAMPUS account here: http://campus.poetryschool.com/



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05 Feb 2015, Open to all, Interactive Online Course, Suzannah Evans.
'There are Maps to anywhere: chromosomes, galaxies, the brain, the cell, the spaces between atoms, cracks in the double helix, the edge of time' (Stephen S Hall). This course will explore maps and other locative media as subjects and vehicles for poetry, focussing on the relationship between poetry and the map, and the ways in which poetry can help us to explore and augment our surroundings. The course will also explore the relationships between place and language, and the way physical location and navigation affects our sense of identity. Inspired by poetry including Kei Miller, Eavan Boland, Liz Berry and Michael Donaghy and of course by your own explorations, you will use poetry to map the histories and ideas that might go unnoticed on the Ordnance Survey.

CAMPUS group: http://campus.poetryschool.com/groups/re-writing-the-map/

Please note: All our online courses take place on CAMPUS, a unique social network and learning platform created by The Poetry School. These courses are open to all students but a basic level of digital literacy is essential. The Poetry School can help you with technical issues, but you also need to be a confident user of digital platforms to take part in these classes. To find out whether an online course is right for you, please email online@poetryschool.com

Register for your free CAMPUS account here: http://campus.poetryschool.com/
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23 Sep 2014, Open to all, Interactive Online Course, Emma Hammond.
In this course you will look at how surrealist writing can create strange new meanings by turning everyday life and language upside down. You will learn how to think anarchically by writing a series of abstract poems using a variety of non-conformist techniques. As well as studying work by poets such as Edward Lear and Lewis Carroll you will also look at less well known work by absurdist writers Daniil Kharms and Alexander Vvedensky, as well as experimental movements such as Flarf that have redefined how we think about poetry. For all its appearance of lightness and frivolity, nonsense is difficult to write. Not making sense is a challenge as we are often taught that making sense is common sense. Nonsense poetry ‘presents the form of meaning while denying us the substance’ and over several weeks you will look at what this meaning is and how to use it to find spontaneity and creativity in our own writing.

CAMPUS group: http://campus.poetryschool.com/groups/the-noetics-of-nonsense

Please note: All our online courses take place on CAMPUS, a unique social network and learning platform created by The Poetry School. These courses are open to all students but a basic level of digital literacy is essential. The Poetry School can help you with technical issues, but you also need to be a confident user of digital platforms to take part in these classes. To find out whether an online course is right for you, please email online@poetryschool.com

Register for your free CAMPUS account here:
http://campus.poetryschool.com/
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18 Sep 2014, Open to all, Interactive Online Course, Dai George.
To whom does a poem speak? A poem communicates a single person’s vision of the world, but it can nevertheless reach out and touch other people in powerful and sometimes world-altering ways. In this course you will think about this paradox of communication and consider how it affects a poem’s mode of address. Initially a private act, does poetry condemn itself to solipsism? Conversely, are ‘public’ poems doomed to make crass gestures in plain language? Between these two weighty poles you will read work from a range of poets who seek to position themselves in a wider community of voices. You will consider poems which are intensely private, which engage with others, which both love and loathe particular places, which directly address a public issue, and which are in tension with devotion to a higher cause. Regular writing exercises will help you to experiment with different modes of address, from the confessional to the polemic and the sweet spots in between.

CAMPUS group: http://campus.poetryschool.com/groups/the-one-and-the-many/

Please note: All our online courses take place on CAMPUS, a unique social network and learning platform created by The Poetry School. These courses are open to all students but a basic level of digital literacy is essential. The Poetry School can help you with technical issues, but you also need to be a confident user of digital platforms to take part in these classes. To find out whether an online course is right for you, please email online@poetryschool.com

Register for your free CAMPUS account here:
http://campus.poetryschool.com/
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15 Sep 2014, Open to all, Interactive Online Course, Clare Pollard.
Is writing about your child always boring or saccharine? Or can poems about parenthood say important things about love, life and death? Was Cyril Connolly right to claim that ‘there is no more sombre enemy of good art than the pram in the hall,’ or can children actually be a rich source of inspiration? Each session, you will look at parenthood from a different angle – through pregnancy, identity, language and letting go. We’ll discuss lullabies and Lorca; Sharon Olds’ ‘Brag’ about childbirth and Coleridge’s sleepless nights; Edward Lear’s ‘Dong with a luminous nose’ and the politics of parenting. There will be lots to read and a writing exercise each week to (hopefully) prove Connolly wrong.
   
CAMPUS group: http://campus.poetryschool.com/groups/the-poetry-of-parenthood/

Please note: All our online courses take place on CAMPUS, a unique social network and learning platform created by The Poetry School. These courses are open to all students but a basic level of digital literacy is essential. The Poetry School can help you with technical issues, but you also need to be a confident user of digital platforms to take part in these classes. To find out whether an online course is right for you, please email online@poetryschool.com

Register for your free CAMPUS account here:
http://campus.poetryschool.com/
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29 Jan 2015, Open to all, Interactive Online Course, A B Jackson.
W H Auden published his long poem 'The Sea and the Mirror' in 1944, five years after he left war-torn England to take up residence in America. It is billed as a 'commentary' on Shakespeare's The Tempest, and includes a number of individual pieces in a wide variety of forms (terza rima, sestina, sonnet, villanelle, blank verse, prose) voiced by the play's characters. This reading course will offer an excellent opportunity to enter Auden's mysterious, multi-layered world and explore these virtuoso poems in their own right as well as in relation to Shakespeare's text, or Peter Greenaway's film, or any other incarnation which takes your interest. The course will take place over ten weeks, with reading notes provided every week in order to generate discussion and your own poems.

CAMPUS group: http://campus.poetryschool.com/groups/this-enchanted-isle-reading-w-h-audens-the-sea-and-the-mirror/

Please note: All our online courses take place on CAMPUS, a unique social network and learning platform created by The Poetry School. These courses are open to all students but a basic level of digital literacy is essential. The Poetry School can help you with technical issues, but you also need to be a confident user of digital platforms to take part in these classes. To find out whether an online course is right for you, please email online@poetryschool.com

Register for your free CAMPUS account here: http://campus.poetryschool.com/
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15 Sep 2014, Open to all, Interactive Online Course, Elzbieta Wójcik-Leese.
This is the first in a new series of online courses suitable for international students, as well as those based in the UK. They are the same as our interactive online courses, however there are no live chats (all feedback is written) and the courses can be completed from any time zone.

‘Translating is reading, reading of the best, the most essential kind’, wrote William H. Gass introducing the concept of ‘transreading’. Would you like to read beyond Herbert, Holub, Popa, Šalamun or Szymborska, writing your own translations and independent poems? In this course you will respond to recent work by Central European poets, strengthening your knowledge of other literatures and invigorating your own poetry. You don’t need to speak Polish, Czech, Hungarian, Romanian or Slovenian – all you need is curiosity and a love of anything trans: transmigration, transgression, transfiguration. Every fortnight you will experiment with one ‘rewriting strategy’ (homophonic translation, erasure, annotation, recontextualization) and transform the texts you’ve read into your own versions. Your fifth and final poem will be a ‘straight’ translation from a Polish crib, which will evolve into a collaborative work composed by the whole group.

CAMPUS group: http://campus.poetryschool.com/groups/transreading-central-europe/

Please note: All our online courses take place on CAMPUS, a unique social network and learning platform created by The Poetry School. These courses are open to all students but a basic level of digital literacy is essential. The Poetry School can help you with technical issues, but you also need to be a confident user of digital platforms to take part in these classes. To find out whether an online course is right for you, please email online@poetryschool.com

Register for your free CAMPUS account here:
http://campus.poetryschool.com/
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26 Sep 2014, Open to all, Interactive Online Course, Catherine Smith.
PLEASE NOTE THAT THE DATES FOR 'VERSE STORIES' ADVERTISED IN OUR PRINT PROGRAMME ARE INCORRECT

When is a poem also a story? It’s been said that short stories often have more in common with poems than novels – the ‘world’ of the short story is self-contained, every word must pull its weight, structured imagery is used to powerful effect. So how can we as poets think about an unfolding ‘plot’ in our poems? In this course, you’ll look at what it means to write ‘narrative poetry’ – whether that means a poem that follows a narrative arc (complication, crisis, resolution) or a poem where narrative ‘devices’ are consciously employed. We’ll look at examples from poets who have explored myth and fairy tale, and from longer contemporary poems by Neil Rollinson, Blake Morrison and Ros Barber.

CAMPUS group: http://campus.poetryschool.com/groups/verse-stories

Please note: All our online courses take place on CAMPUS, a unique social network and learning platform created by The Poetry School. These courses are open to all students but a basic level of digital literacy is essential. The Poetry School can help you with technical issues, but you also need to be a confident user of digital platforms to take part in these classes. To find out whether an online course is right for you, please email online@poetryschool.com

Register for your free CAMPUS account here:
http://campus.poetryschool.com/
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25 Sep 2014, Open to all, Interactive Online Course, Steve Ely.
Shelley famously held that poets were the ‘unacknowledged legislators of the world’. 2014 Forward Prize judge Jeremy Paxman would like to agree, but sees contemporary English poetry as ‘conniving at its own irrelevance’ by no longer engaging with ‘ordinary people’. This course will enable participants to consider how poets might engage more widely and effectively with civil society without pandering or resorting to the soap box. The tension between maintaining the purity of the artistic vision and the compromise demanded by consideration of real or imagined audiences will be explored. Participants will consider different types of socially engaged poetry by poets including Shelley himself, Tony Harrison, Geoffrey Hill, Moniza Alvi, Carol Ann Duffy, Gerard Manley Hopkins, W.B. Yeats, John Montague, Seamus Heaney, Bertolt Brecht, Sorley Maclean and Vasko Popa, and will apply their learning by writing poems that engage with social issues in a range of styles.

CAMPUS group: http://campus.poetryschool.com/groups/versus-vehemence-and-vision-poetry-of-social-engagement

Please note: All our online courses take place on CAMPUS, a unique social network and learning platform created by The Poetry School. These courses are open to all students but a basic level of digital literacy is essential. The Poetry School can help you with technical issues, but you also need to be a confident user of digital platforms to take part in these classes. To find out whether an online course is right for you, please email online@poetryschool.com

Register for your free CAMPUS account here:
http://campus.poetryschool.com/
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04 Feb 2015, Beginner, Interactive Online Course, Nii Ayikwei Parkes.
Where does a poem begin? What marks the difference between a poem and other forms of
writing? Exploring some of the defining elements of poetry, such as the line ending, this course will unpack the crafting of poetry, from the most basic fun rhyme to subtle political commentary. Although the approaches used may be wacky, there will still be a focus on good old-fashioned editing, the whittling of things to their most beautiful essence, never forgetting that poems begin in the land of play, the world of fun. If you have ever wanted to write poetry but were not sure how to start, this is where it begins.

CAMPUS group: http://campus.poetryschool.com/groups/where-it-begins-a-course-for-new-poets/

Please note: All our online courses take place on CAMPUS, a unique social network and learning platform created by The Poetry School. These courses are open to all students but a basic level of digital literacy is essential. The Poetry School can help you with technical issues, but you also need to be a confident user of digital platforms to take part in these classes. To find out whether an online course is right for you, please email online@poetryschool.com

Register for your free CAMPUS account here: http://campus.poetryschool.com/
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30 Jan 2015, Open to all, Interactive Online Course, Ryan Van Winkle.
It is a common misconception that poets write autobiographical works which centre solely on their own experiences. In this course we aim to challenge that notion and will work on writing poetry through research, quotation and character. The course will involve a wide-range of assignments asking students to research science, history, political events, and even to imagine a distant future. We will attempt to write about countries we've never been to, wars we've never experienced, theories we don't understand, disasters we had no part in and photos in which our faces don't appear. The course will use journalism, photographs, streaming audio and video to offer a broad range of inspiration and source material.

CAMPUS group: http://campus.poetryschool.com/groups/write-what-you-dont-know-research-writing-and-the-apparently-confessional/

Please note: All our online courses take place on CAMPUS, a unique social network and learning platform created by The Poetry School. These courses are open to all students but a basic level of digital literacy is essential. The Poetry School can help you with technical issues, but you also need to be a confident user of digital platforms to take part in these classes. To find out whether an online course is right for you, please email online@poetryschool.com

Register for your free CAMPUS account here: http://campus.poetryschool.com/
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28 Jan 2015, Open to all, Interactive Online Course, John Challis.
Cinema has changed the way we view the world. Inspired by film and the way that it coerces us into reimaging our lives behind the lens, this course will explore the writing of ‘genre’ poetry. Focusing on Westerns, Apocalyptic Disaster, Film Noir, Romantic Comedies, and Horror, this course will inspire you to tell your life stories in poetic form as though they were set within these genres. As the first poetry course with a viewing list as long as its reading list, by the end you’ll have a sequence of poems that take in everything from shoot-outs at dawn, climate change, alien invasion, pessimistic private eyes, quirky love affairs and dark slasher thrillers. This is a course for film and poetry lovers.

CAMPUS group: http://campus.poetryschool.com/groups/you-the-movie-horror-western-romance-noir-and-disaster-poetry/

Please note: All our online courses take place on CAMPUS, a unique social network and learning platform created by The Poetry School. These courses are open to all students but a basic level of digital literacy is essential. The Poetry School can help you with technical issues, but you also need to be a confident user of digital platforms to take part in these classes. To find out whether an online course is right for you, please email online@poetryschool.com

Register for your free CAMPUS account here: http://campus.poetryschool.com/