Online

Our interactive online courses take place on a networked platform called Campus – where students will be able to take courses and interact with other students within open and closed groups within the platform. 

The interactive online courses will still run as they did previously, with students posting or circulating poems in advance of a two hour live chat session. During the chat session, the tutor and your fellow students post responses to the circulated work.  Each live chat will be archived for you to revisit later. There will also be accompanying groups, both inside and outside the courses, where you can talk to your fellow students in between chats.

Written-feedback based courses don't have a live chat element – discussion of students' poems takes place within a closed group, with an uploaded document of tutor comments at convenient times throughout the course.

Online courses are a great way to connect with other poets around the world, and you don't even have to leave the house. All you need is an internet connection and a computer.

Campus is at www.campus.poetryschool.com

You will need to have easy access to the internet via a broadband connection. 

11 courses found
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07 May 2014, Open to all, Interactive Online Course, Various (see course details for more).
Tutors: Liz Berry, Richie McCaffery, Miriam Gamble, Liane Strauss, Ryan Van Winkle

Five of our favourite poets. Five random exercises. Plunge into the unknown and explore the possibilities of your voice and verse technique with this mystery assortment of poetic delights. Each assignment on 5 Easy Pieces has been uniquely created by one our hand-selected team of tutors, each one aimed at students of all levels. The twist? Your assignments will only be revealed at very last moment, exactly two weeks prior to each live chat. If you’re looking for a variety of stimulating activities to help generate new kinds of poetry or simply fancy putting your poetic wits to test, you need look no further. What secrets will this sweet jar reveal? Will it be a Chocolate Hazelnut Dream, or one of those nasty things with the orange liqueur? There’s only one way to find out…


Please note: Online courses are open to all students but a basic level of digital literacy is essential. The Poetry School can help you with CAMPUS technical issues, but you need to be a confident user of digital platforms to take part in these classes. To find out whether an online course is right for you, please email online@poetryschool.com
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13 May 2014, Open to all, Interactive Online Course, Katrina Naomi.
How many ‘selves’ have you got? And is all poetry autobiographical? Come and find out on this interactive course mixing reading and discussion, the generation of new poems, theory, and feedback on your poetry. Each session, Katrina will set a writing exercise that builds on poem examples. You will consider themes such as the nature of memory and truth, persona and the self, gender, ethics - and whether the term ‘confessional’ should be consigned to the bin. You’ll also discuss work by Emily Berry, TedHughes, Antjie Krog, Robert Lowell, Kei Miller, Sharon Olds, Pascale Petit, Sylvia Plath, Anne Sexton, Sam Willetts and Yusuf Komunyakaa.


Please note: Online courses are open to all students but a basic level of digital literacy is essential. The Poetry School can help you with CAMPUS technical issues, but you need to be a confident user of digital platforms to take part in these classes. To find out whether an online course is right for you, please email online@poetryschool.com
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15 May 2014, Open to all, Interactive Online Course, Claire Trévien.
Poets have always written about place, whether it is the shock of the new or the capturing of the familiar. In this age of globalisation and multiculturalism, how can we, as poets, avoid the pitfalls of poetic tourism and othering while bringing our own unique take to the subject? On this course we will look at different aspects of home: homes lost, homes found, homes unknown. Students will be exposed to a variety of voices who have tackled such topics. This will include poetry in translation and poetry written in a second language, in order to consider how language in itself can or can’t be a home. This course will encourage creative and experimental responses to the concept to find your own way to deal with this always pertinent topic.


Please note: Online courses are open to all students but a basic level of digital literacy is essential. The Poetry School can help you with CAMPUS technical issues, but you need to be a confident user of digital platforms to take part in these classes. To find out whether an online course is right for you, please email online@poetryschool.com
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06 May 2014, Advanced, Course, Roddy Lumsden.
Sometimes it seems that the ‘poetic’ has disappeared from poetry. Plain language and prose constructs have come to dominate the art. This course will encourage participants to extend their diction, to revel in the richness of language and to dive head first into the dictionary of language and also into the specialist books and magazines which relate to their personal interests. You will explore what makes an ‘idiolect’, the word choices and phrasing unique to each poet and look at the work of poets such as Amy Clampitt, D A Powell and Ahren Warner who employ rich poetic language which gives their work texture and character.

Please note: Online courses are open to all students but a basic level of digital literacy is essential. The Poetry School can help you with CAMPUS technical issues, but you need to be a confident user of digital platforms to take part in these classes. To find out whether an online course is right for you, please email online@poetryschool.com
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Online: Mythopoesis
12 May 2014, Open to all, Interactive Online Course, John Clegg.
‘There is one story, and one story only / That will prove worth your telling’: so wrote Robert Graves, in ‘To Juan at the Winter Solstice’. This course will explore how folktales, myth cycles and other oral literature can provide stimuli and technical possibilities for poets working today. What separates archetypes from clichés, plain from flat language? Close reading and discussion of some less familiar mythic texts, as well as contemporary poetry that takes its bearing from these themes (including works by Ted Hughes, Vasko Popa, Selima Hill, Les Murray and Helen Ivory), will be interspersed with exercises allowing you to employ the stylistic features of myth as prompts for your own writing.


Please note: Online courses are open to all students but a basic level of digital literacy is essential. The Poetry School can help you with CAMPUS technical issues, but you need to be a confident user of digital platforms to take part in these classes. To find out whether an online course is right for you, please email online@poetryschool.com
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16 May 2014, Intermediate, Interactive Online Course, Antony Dunn.
Do you have a heap of discarded poems sitting on your sideboard or desktop which just won’t work no matter how many revisions you make? The Poetry School’s online feedback workshops provide a place for the general improvement of your left-for-dead poems, your work in need of refreshment, and your brand new pieces. Bring poems of any size or shape to these sessions for detailed written feedback once a fortnight from a tutor, and general group feedback from fellow students. This group will be especially good for those with a large batch of poems that they are looking to ready for magazine submission.

Please note: Online courses are open to all students but a basic level of digital literacy is essential. The Poetry School can help you with CAMPUS technical issues, but you need to be a confident user of digital platforms to take part in these classes. To find out whether an online course is right for you, please email online@poetryschool.com
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09 May 2014, Open to all, Interactive Online Course, Hannah Lowe.
Do you have a heap of discarded poems sitting on your sideboard or desktop which just won’t work no matter how many revisions you make? The Poetry School’s online feedback workshops provide a place for the general improvement of your left-for-dead poems, your work in need of refreshment, and your brand new pieces. Bring poems of any size or shape to these sessions for detailed written feedback once a fortnight from a tutor, and general group feedback from fellow students. This group will be especially good for those with a large batch of poems that they are looking to ready for magazine submission.

Please note: Online courses are open to all students but a basic level of digital literacy is essential. The Poetry School can help you with CAMPUS technical issues, but you need to be a confident user of digital platforms to take part in these classes. To find out whether an online course is right for you, please email online@poetryschool.com
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05 May 2014, Open to all, Course, Tamar Yoseloff.
‘It’s much easier to consume the visual image than to read something’ said the American poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti in the 1960s. Now, more than ever, we are surrounded by visual images; on TV and computer screens, in shop windows and in glossy magazines, in art galleries and on billboards. How do you make sense of these overwhelming visual stimuli in words? You’ll look at poetic strategies for creating narratives and metaphors from the images we find around us, and this course will include an online ‘gallery’ as a source for inspiration and writing exercises.

(This is brand new version of 'Poetry and the Visual' with new images and exercises, and can be enjoyed by all students, including those who have taken 'Poetry and the Visual' before).

Please note: Online courses are open to all students but a basic level of digital literacy is essential. The Poetry School can help you with CAMPUS technical issues, but you need to be a confident user of digital platforms to take part in these classes. To find out whether an online course is right for you, please email online@poetryschool.com
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10 May 2014, Open to all, Interactive Online Course, Alvin Pang.
Names have power: they can be given or erased, can mask or reveal, be traded in love or through sacrifice. Names can be sacred or profane, serve as spells, be called upon or cursed. Abstract ideas, personified and given name, become gods and monsters. Much writing, and poetry in particular, is impelled by the need to give voice to thought or experience; to give each a name. This course will look at poems from across time and space to explore how names and naming have been used in different ways to come to terms with what it means to be human, and more. Have a go at naming (or renaming) the things that matter in your own world, through a variety of fun follow-up writing games.


Please note: Online courses are open to all students but a basic level of digital literacy is essential. The Poetry School can help you with CAMPUS technical issues, but you need to be a confident user of digital platforms to take part in these classes. To find out whether an online course is right for you, please email online@poetryschool.com
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14 May 2014, Beginner, Interactive Online Course, Nii Ayikwei Parkes.
Where does a poem begin? What marks the difference between a poem and other forms of writing? Exploring some of the defining elements of poetry, such as the line ending, this course will unpack the crafting of poetry, from the most basic fun rhyme to subtle political commentary. Although the approaches used may be wacky, there will still be a focus on good old-fashioned editing, the whittling of things to their most beautiful essence, never forgetting that poems begin in the land of play, the world of fun. If you have ever wanted to write poetry but were not sure how to start, this is where it begins.


Please note: Online courses are open to all students but a basic level of digital literacy is essential. The Poetry School can help you with CAMPUS technical issues, but you need to be a confident user of digital platforms to take part in these classes. To find out whether an online course is right for you, please email online@poetryschool.com
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08 May 2014, Open to all, Interactive Online Course, Helen Ivory.
‘The first and the simplest emotion which we discover in the human mind is Curiosity. By curiosity,I mean whatever the desire we have for, or the pleasure we take, in novelty’ – Edmund Burke. Are you a curious person? Would you follow the white rabbit or unlock all of the doors of Bluebeard’s Castle? Do you see science as organised wonder? Are you enthralled by the idiosyncratic? Do you ask lots of questions? Then you’ve come to the right place. In the 16th Century, Wunderkammers or ‘Cabinets of Curiosities’ were put together by apothecaries, physicians and botanists who wished to study the objects they had assembled. They were used to expand knowledge and also as reliquaries to pleasure, and such cabinets are the precursors to contemporary galleries and museums. On this course you will consider the nature of curiosity, make use of online resources, examine curious objects and explore the idea of memory as a Wunderkammer. There’s the White Rabbit! No time to lose!

(This course is a repeat of one that has run previously).

Please note: Online courses are open to all students but a basic level of digital literacy is essential. The Poetry School can help you with CAMPUS technical issues, but you need to be a confident user of digital platforms to take part in these classes. To find out whether an online course is right for you, please email online@poetryschool.com